It is an herb known as centaury. Medicinal purposes are served by drying the parts of the plant that grow above ground.
It is an herb known as centaury. Medicinal purposes are served by drying the parts of the plant that grow above ground.

Centaury (Centaurium erytraea)

Description:

It is an herb known as centaury (Centaurium erytraea). Medicinal purposes are served by drying the parts of the plant that grow above ground. Common centaury and European centaury are common names for Centaurium erythraea, a Gentian-family flowering plant.
This herb grows to a height of half a meter as an erect biennial. An erect, leafy stem sprouts from a basal rosette, which can branch. Erect inflorescences grow parallel to the stem and are arranged in opposition to the triangular leaves on the stem. There may be many flowers in each inflorescence.

The features include:

Plants of this species are widespread across the United States. Red centaury is used for blood ailments, yellow for choleric diseases, and white for phlegm and water illnesses. There are many species and colors; the English distinguish between them by using red centaury for blood illnesses, yellow for choleric diseases, and white for phlegm and water illnesses.
There is not only variation in color; the centaury family expands into many soil conditions, such as moist meadows, among high grass, on the prairies, and in damp ditches. It is most effective to gather it between June and September, when it is in full bloom. American varieties are considered more attractive than European varieties because they close at night.
Common centaury and European centaury are common names for Centaurium erythraea, a gentian-family flowering plant.
Common centaury and European centaury are common names for Centaurium erythraea, a Gentian-family flowering plant. Photo credit: Steve Chilton

The Use Of:

The bitter properties of this excellent old American remedy are exceptionally useful in treating periodic febrile diseases, dyspepsia, and convalescence from fevers. It strengthens the stomach and improves digestive health.
Suitable for rheumatoid arthritis and all joint pains Expelling worms and reviving your menstrual cycle can be achieved with warm infusions of the following: the powder, 12–1 dram; the extract, 2–6 grains To 1 cup of boiling water, add 1 teaspoonful of loose dried herb. All herbal teas and preparations benefit from this bitter herb. If you want to enhance the flavor, add anise, cardamom, peppermint, ginger, fennel, etc.
Homeopathic Uses: The roots are used as tinctures in the following conditions: coryza, diarrhea, inflammation of the eyes, fever, homesickness, intermittent influenza, and disappearance of vision.
Experience: Centaurium erytraea, also called “a thousand golden leaves” and many other beautiful names, is a Russian centaury. Several herbal preparations are prescribed along with centaury by official medicine. For high blood pressure, gallbladder malfunctions, liver malfunctions, and gallbladder malfunctions, centaury tea and its home extract are prescribed in folk medicine.
When it comes to stomach ailments, the bitter tonic works in synergy with nature, stimulating digestion and appetite without destroying necessary secretions. A persistent dose of centaury prevents the parasitic tapeworm from maintaining its circle of hooks and suckers that allow it to live inside the mucous membrane of the host’s intestines.
Names commonly used: Centaury’s common names are rose pink, bitter bloom, “feverfoullie”, “gentian,” and bitter clover.
Solvents: both water and alcohol.
Medical Parts: The medical part consists of herbs in their entirety.
Body Influence: tonic, febrifuge, and diaphoretic.
It is an herb known as centaury (Centaurium erytraea). Medicinal purposes are served by drying the parts of the plant that grow above ground.
It is an herb known as centaury (Centaurium erytraea). Medicinal purposes are served by drying the parts of the plant that grow above ground. Photo credit: Donald Macauley