Home Amazing & Trending Success Secrets for Surf Casting

Success Secrets for Surf Casting

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Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half.
Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half.
Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half. A good time to cast artificial or natural bait is near the breaker when the white water comes up and the bait falls into the white water. There is plenty of time to play fish-and that’s a lot!
If you make the play long and drawn out, you will not only have more fun, but you will also pass many idle moments. In addition, you will also save much big fish you could otherwise lose. As the fish enters the break or is tossed your way by the wash, keep your line tight.
Most importantly, rising tides from ninety minutes on, after the turn, up until full flood are the most productive. However, the ebb tide from flood to half tide can be equally productive, especially after two hours. Be aware of reefs, bars, gullies, sluices, and runouts. Spot these during low tide, write them down in a notebook, and you’ll know where the tide will wash through on both its rise and fall. These spots are where you’ll find most of the feeding fish.
Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half.
Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half. Photo Credit – Wikimedia
A hungry gamester can find plenty of food and shelter in the sloughs and pockets. You should move on to a clear spot if the water becomes cloudy, dirty, or full of seaweed. Gulls and terns are worth watching. The water around them is usually full of bait, and lots of fish are after it, so if the gulls stay around, you better stay around too! In most cases, you’ll know that game fish are near if you see terns diving through the air after bait fish. Take care not to cast your net too far!
It is enough to cover twenty to sixty yards with a lure over sloughs, washes, or gullies, rather than sixty yards with no particular location. That’s how easy it is! Casting is easier and more accurate when timing, coordination, and rod leverage are utilized instead of brute strength. Make your own “fish-finder” rig with the help of an experienced surf-caster, or purchase one. You can save a lot of time changing hooks, lures, and baits with a snap swivel on the end of your leader.
Water will not curl into your rubber boots if you wear short, water-resistant pants outside them. If you have trouble stirring them up with a large casting squid, try a smaller one! The blade edge of your knife can restore brightness to a dull knife if it has become dull. Make sure you look behind you every time before casting to avoid nasty wounds to spectators and fishing partners, such as eyes, ears, scalps, etc.
Lead sinkers that weigh three ounces or hooks that measure 6/0 are bad medicine if you are too close to onlookers! Don’t just keep hook-hones in your kit, but also consider a carborundum stone for whetting your knife and keeping hooks sharp.
If you have fished in weeds or water that is dirty and sand-filled, rinse your Cuttyhunk line in fresh water after. Months will pass before it needs to be replaced. Make your casting squid more luring by adding pork rind, chamois, or rag (in a pinch) to the hook. Don’t waste any time reeling it in fast!

Read More – Weever Fish – Danger on the Beach

Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half.
Before surf casting, wet your line. Water should be poured over it. Backlashes will be reduced by half. Photo Credit – fabrizio.binello

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